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20130204
20130212
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
'll be following this. >>> to washington now. members of congress remain focused on deficits, spending and how to head off the looming sequestration cuts poised to kick in early next month. in separate interviews on sunday, house minority leader nancy pelosi and majority leader eric cantor laid out the economic dividing lines. >> what we need is growth. we need growth with jobs. and if you have spending cuts, education of our children and other investments like the national institutes of health where you are hindering growth, you're not going to reduce the deficit. so it is almost a false argument to say we have a spending problem. we have a budget deficit problem that we have to address. we think the deficit and the national debt are at immoral levels. we think they must be reduced. we're sick and tired of paying interest on the national debt. and that's 15% -- that's a large percentage of the budget. >> the tax fight for the president means higher taxes, more revenue. again, we can't be raising taxes every three months in this town, david. and you know, the bottom line is we want tax reform,
, there are good points. for instance, deficits are decreasing. however, all i ever hear from republicans is the president needs to get serious. from speaker john boehner. that's the best impersonation i can give you. >> it's not bad. >> wasn't very good, nothing personal. >> but dana, is that it? >> well, that was a little raspy, your john boehner. but i think you've captured the sentiment, more or less correctly. and yes, the cbo report shows that the deficit is shrinking. but it is also showing the efforts to shrink the deficit have taken away from growth and the economy. you can't have one of these things without the other. now, i think there's a fallacy in the first question you posed to jared. that is that republicans would be very upset if there were a double-dip recession in a political sense as rush limbaugh and others have stated, they may be in a stronger position if the economy goes back into recession. then the president and his majority party will be less powerful. so they actually have a political incentive. >> hang on a second, dana. you're saying something that's troublin
will do more than anything else to shrink the deficit and long-term tax reform, long-term entitlement reform. that's the right way to do it. but to cut now because we want to reform entitlements later doesn't make any sense. >> let me ask about that. you talk about tax reform. that's something the left wants and something the right wants. the problem is with tax reform, what it entails. here's the president today talking about tax reform, closing loopholes. >> there is no reason that the jobs of thousands of americans who work in national security or education or clean energy, not to mention the growth of the entire economy, should be put in jeopardy just because folks in washington couldn't come together to eliminate a few special interest tax loopholes or government programs that we agree need some reform. >> they're not little and they're not few and they're not easy. of the five of the top ten tax expenditures, these are loopholes. mortgage interest deduction, the deduction we get for health care, the child tax credit, deduction for state and local taxes, charity. okay. the presid
such as the deficit, guns, or health care. the white house has certainly gotten the message on jobs and isn't waiting until tomorrow night to start getting its message out before the inevitable republican attacks start raining down. take a listen. >> you will hear in the president's state of the union an outline from him for his plan to create jobs and grow the middle class. the middle class is the engine that drives this country forward and which will, if it is given the right tools and the right opportunities, will drive us forward in the 21st century. >> let's get to our guest, democratic strategist bob shrum, and karen finney. the president is expected to use the speech as a way to frame the debate over the so-called sequester which would mean $85 billion in cuts that republicans claim are entirely his fault. take a listen to this. >> you know, the president, he's the one who proposed the sequester in the first place. >> it's what president obama proposed in 2011. >> it is inevitable quite frankly. now these cuts are coming by law and it's law the president signed and advocated. >> okay, professo
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)